About Bitterne

Bitterne is a thriving community, bordering Sholing to the west and Harefield to the north. It is a suburb of the city of Southampton, with its maritime history and docklands, that serve the thriving cruise industry.

While Bitterne has no significant industry to speak of, it is a quiet enclave for residential homes, with open parkland, tree-lined streets and a slower pace of life compared to the city.

As you would expect, transport links are excellent. Bitterne sits at the junction of the A34 and the A3024, giving easy access to the M27 motorway. It also has good rail links, thanks to Bitterne Railway Station, and catching a bus into the city is easy with a first-class bus service.

History of Bitterne

From Roman settlements to medieval manor houses, Bitterne is steeped in history. The name derives from the old English words Byht and Aern, which means “house near a bend.” This is most likely a reference to Bitterne Manor, located on the bend of the River Itchen.

Bitterne Manor sits on the site of Roman Clausentum, which is the forerunner of the city of Southampton we know and love today. The house still commands views over the River Itchen, but modern apartments vie for position on the former grounds.

Famous visitors to the manor include Robert Kilwardby, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the novelist Nicholas Freeling, who wrote the Van Der Valk detective novels.

Bitterne was never mentioned in the Domesday Book, but it does appear in records from the 11th century. By 1665, the settlement of Bitterne consisted of 75 people and 14 dwellings.

For almost 600 years, Bitterne was an agricultural community. It wasn’t until the early 1800s, with the construction of the Northam Bridge, that transport routes opened up to help with the expansion of Southampton, and Bitterne began the transformation into the urban settlement it is today.

Bitterne richly deserves its reputation as a family-friendly place to live, with great schools, road and rail links and excellent facilities.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop in or email our team at the Bitterne office.

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“From Roman settlements to medieval manor houses, Bitterne is steeped in history. The name derives from the old English words Byht and Aern, which means “house near a bend.” This is most likely a reference to Bitterne Manor, located on the bend of the River Itchen.”

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About Waterlooville

Waterlooville is the perfect commuter town. It is handily situated about 2 miles north of Portsmouth, making it an ideal residential area for those who work in the city.

You get a nice mix of town, urban and countryside with the outlying villages of Catherington, Blendworth, Cowplain, Hambledon, Horndean and Widley. There are several junctions accessing the A3, which take you south to Portsmouth, Chichester and beyond, as well as Petersfield and eventually, London.

The newly completed Hindhead Tunnel has slashed the congestion and the travelling time to the capital, making Waterlooville the ideal residential location for those holding down a job in London.

With several well-regarded schools and plenty of shops, pubs and public facilities, Waterlooville is the ideal spot to look for your new home.

History of Waterlooville

Waterlooville derives its name from the coaching inn that stood in the centre of the old village, in Wait End Lane. Legend has it that the returning soldiers from the battle of Waterloo disembarked at Portsmouth and caught the stagecoach which ran along the corridor of the old A3.

The pub was a stopping point for coach travellers, and many of the soldiers liked it so much that they decided to settle there, and so the name Waterlooville was born.

The original Heroes of Waterloo pub was demolished in 1966, but a new one stands to the north of the town bearing the same name.

Marconi built a facility near the town in the 1980s, where they developed their underwater defence systems, including the Stingray anti-submarine torpedo.

Today, Waterlooville is one of the best commuter towns on the south coast. It shares several junctions with the A3, and there is easy access to a railway station at Bedhampton.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop in or email our team at the Waterlooville office.

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“Waterlooville is the perfect commuter town. It is handily situated about 2 miles north of Portsmouth, so it makes it an ideal residential area for those who work in the city.”

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About Southsea

Southsea is a little gem on the south coast, full of character, history, amazing buildings and famous sons and daughters. For a densely packed peninsula, Southsea has retained a sense of Victorian charm with wide-open spaces. Southsea Common spans some 480 acres next to the shingle beach, and the promenade has a vibrant cafe culture.

Southsea is a desirable place because it has everything you could want from a cosmopolitan city: some of the best restaurants and dining on the south coast, a pier, a funfair, and so much history, it would take more than a couple of paragraphs to list it all.

Southsea has excellent ferry links to Europe and the Isle of Wight, along with a railway station and major roads leading out of the city.

There is a large student population in Southsea, which adds to the vibrancy of the area. There is a mix of houses ranging from modern flats, converted Victorian sea-front villas, Georgian townhouses and large properties with a high-end price tag.

Whether you are a student, a first-time buyer or someone looking for their “forever” home, Southsea has everything you could possibly need.

History of Southsea

It might surprise you to learn that Southsea was largely unknown until the mid-16th century when Henry VIII ordered the building of Southsea Castle as part of extensive sea defences. Prior to the development of the fortifications, Southsea was largely farmland and marshland.

The land was originally owned by Thomas Croxton, and so when he started to develop the farmland in the early 19th century, it was originally called Croxton Town.

With the expansion of the dockyard, Southsea grew to accommodate the influx of workers, and the development continued. The town became fashionable during the 19th century, and it became a bathing destination for the middle and upper classes.

Most of the original streets still exist; however, Southsea was heavily bombed during the war, destroying much of the original buildings.

In the 1950s, Southsea underwent redevelopment, and many of the buildings we see today were constructed. While Southsea never quite recovered the visitor numbers it once enjoyed, it still grew through the 20th century and remained a popular seaside destination.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop-in or email our team at the Southsea office.

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“Southsea has retained a sense of Victorian charm with wide-open spaces, a public common of some 480 acres next to the shingle beach and a vibrant cafe life.”

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About Portsmouth

Portsmouth is probably one of the most famous cities in the world. It has been the home of the Royal Navy since the time of Henry VIII. He stood on the battlements of Southsea Castle in July 1545, watching his flagship, the Mary Rose, sink into the Solent.

Today, the city is a thriving mix of industrial, naval, commercial and residential, with a significant military presence and a substantial student population. According to the 2011 census, the population has topped 200,000 people.

Many of the old waterfront docks and naval bases have been repurposed as high-end shopping and eating destinations. Gunwharf Quays is an excellent example of reviving redundant military sites like HMS Vernon and breathing new life into them.

As you would expect for such a grand city, there are excellent road, rail and sea links. It has many stations, bus routes and of course the International Ferry Port.

Portsmouth has got the lot.

It has the sea, quaint Georgian architecture, cobbled streets, modern buildings and a diverse community of old and young.

You can take in the charms of Old Portsmouth, with its winding streets and naval history seeping from every corner of the old buildings, or indulge in the nightlife of Guildhall Square, with bars, clubs and eateries.

Portsmouth is such a great place to live. It’s the reason why it is a thriving peninsula, as popular today as it was when the Romans first settled there.

History of Portsmouth

The Romans came in the late third century, building a fort at nearby Portchester. They called it Portus Adurni. For centuries, Portsmouth and the south coast was vulnerable to Danish Viking invasions, suffering devastating attacks that almost completely wiped out the English population.

Defences improved, and as the Kings came and went, so did the town’s military capabilities. Its strategic placement at the mouth of a deep harbour made it the natural choice for the home of the Royal Navy. Deep waters meant large ships and a narrow port entrance made it easier to defend.

The oldest working dock in the world is situated at the Portsmouth Dockyards, built-in 1495 by Henry VII, and No.1 Dock is still in use today. Portsmouth can also lay claim as the birthplace of the industrial revolution. Marc Isambard Brunel set up the world’s first mass-production line, established in the Portsmouth Dockyard Block Mills.

It became the world’s most industrialised site, employing over 8,000 people. Portsmouth boasts many famous names in history, from Charles Dickens or Isambard Kingdom Brunel to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Peter Sellers; the city has produced the great and the good.

This rich tapestry of history, achievement and pride is still felt in the old city today. Everywhere you look, there are reminders of a stately past, as well as green shoots of new industries, technologies and greatness yet to be written.

Portsmouth’s story is still unfolding, which makes the future all the more exciting.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop-in or email our team at the Portsmouth office.

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This rich tapestry of history, achievement and pride is still felt in the old city today. Everywhere you look there are reminders of a stately past, as well as green shoots of new industries, technologies and greatness yet to be written.

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About Park Gate

Park Gate connects Locks Heath to the south, Segensworth to the east and Sarisbury to the west. It is a small town with a diverse mix of properties, ranging from town locations to country homes.

Much of Park Gate is rural, with farms and country estates, making it the ideal area to retire. That said, it doesn’t lack great road and rail links. The M27 runs alongside Park Gate, giving easy access to Southampton, and the A27 is nearby, servicing a large retail park to the south at Segensworth.

If you prefer the train, there is a station a few minutes walk from the town centre, and if you like a bit of retail therapy, restaurants and the cinema, Whitely should have enough to keep you smiling.

For those of you with sea legs, Swanwick and its many marinas and boatyards should have everything you need, thanks to the River Hamble.

Park Gate is popular with retirees and families alike, making it an ideal spot for those who want to experience quiet English town life but with all the conveniences of retail parks, open spaces, restaurants and cinemas.

History of Park Gate

Park Gate has a relatively modern history compared to neighbouring towns and cities. It was developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to service the vast strawberry industry that dominated the area.

In 1913, over 3,000 strawberries were distributed from Park Gate by road and rail, thanks to the oddly-named Swanwick railway station, even though it is in Park Gate.

Most of the town was developed during the 20th century, culminating in the expansion of Segensworth commercial and retail park to the south and Whitely to the north.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop-in or email our team at the Park Gate office.

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“Park Gate connects Locks Heath to the south, Segensworth to the east and Sarisbury to the west. It is a small town with a diverse mix of properties, ranging from town locations to country homes.”

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About Havant

Havant lies between Chichester to the east and Portsmouth to the west, and like many other towns on the A3 corridor, it has excellent road links. Couple that with the main bus station situated in the town centre, and you can see why so many people like to call it home.

There are many outlying villages to choose from if you fancy something more rural. There’s Rowlands Castle, Bedhampton, Langstone and Hayling Island, with its beaches and large open spaces.

There are also major roads within easy reach. The A27, the A3 and the M27 are a short hop away, making it ideal for people commuting to the neighbouring cities.

Havant has a great mix of affordable homes, like those found in Leigh park, and at the other end of the scale, high-end properties in the villages nestled nearby. It has the Meridian Shopping Centre, Tescos and a retail park with prominent high street names.

History of Havant

From raging fires, earthquakes and dancing bears, Havant has had a colourful past. Havant can trace its roots back to Roman and Anglo-Saxon times, like so many towns and cities on the south coast.

Havant is famed for its natural springs, with one still in existence near the southwest of St. Faith’s Churchyard. In 935 AD, Havant was called Hamafunta, which means the spring of Hama.

In 1086, Havant had a population of 100, and the primary source of industry was water from the springs, producing beer and parchment. The last parchment manufacturer closed its doors as late as 1936, and rumour has it that the Treaty of Versaille was signed on Havant-made parchment paper.

The old town was ravaged by fire in 1760, leaving the church and a cluster of houses still standing. Today, they are the Old House at Home pub, which boasts a central beam from the Spanish Armada and a bear post that is reputed to be the location of the last dancing bear in England.

Havant has even suffered two earthquakes, one in 1784 and the other in 1811.

If you want to live in a place that drips with ancient history, incident and intrigue, Havant has everything you could possibly want.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop-in or email our team at the Havant office.

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“From raging fires, earthquakes and dancing bears, Havant has had a colourful past. Like so many towns and cities on the south coast, Havant can trace its roots back to Roman and Anglo-Saxon times.”

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About Shirley

The former village of Shirley sits on the western side of Southampton. It is the ideal place to live if you want the best mix of house styles, prices and locations. There are affordable homes for first-time buyers and a blend of mid-priced and high-end houses to suit every bank balance.

Shirley is primarily a retail and suburban location, with great road and bus links to the city of Southampton. It has schools, libraries and many other facilities that you could possibly want when settling into a new area.

If you want all the convenience of big city life without the downsides, try settling in Shirley. You get a little bit more for your money but retain all the road and transport links associated with a significant hub like Southampton.

History of Shirley

Shirley is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Scir Leah, which means bright clearing in the woods. It was listed as a manor with a mill and three mill ponds. The ponds were situated just north of the Winchester Road, and one still remains today at the Lordswood Greenway. 

Shirley’s industry consisted of an ironworks, a brewery, and a Royal Mail laundry to service the mail ships visiting Southampton. 

Today, Shirley is largely a residential area with dense housing stock and a large council estate built in the 1960s to replace rows of older terraced houses.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop in or email our team at the Shirley office.

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“If you want all the convenience of the city without the downsides, try settling in Shirley. You get a little bit more for your money but retain all the road and transport links associated with a significant city like Southampton.”

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About Gosport

Gosport is a seaside town with miles of coastline, rich naval history and commanding views of historic Portsmouth harbour, the home of the Royal Navy.

Aside from the naval connections, Gosport is a haven for boaters and yachts, with excellent marina facilities, access to the Solent and beyond and state-of-the-art waterside developments.

If you like the water and sailing, Gosport has everything you could wish for. And just a short hop on the ferry, and you are in Portsmouth with its architecture, history and some of the best shopping anywhere in the UK.

Gosport has a population of around 90,000 people, and the borough consists of commercial and residential buildings nestled alongside open spaces like the Alver Valley and Browndown, with miles of unspoilt countryside and rivers.

The transport links are excellent, with the A32 and the Bus Rapid Transit route taking you straight to Fareham and beyond. The ferry across Portsmouth harbour is one of the most picturesque commutes in the country, with regular crossings every 15 minutes.

History of Gosport

You can trace Gosport’s history back to the Anglo-Saxons, who built the first settlement in Rughenor (modern-day Rowner). The word means a rough bank or slope. Along with Alverstoke, so named because the River Alver meets the sea at Stokes Bay, both settlements are mentioned in the Domesday Book.

Gosport has long been a naval town, with HMS Sultan and the Naval Armaments Facility, along with the Naval Stores at Weevil Lane and St. Georges Barracks, all built to supply the most powerful navy in the world.

The town has strong royal connections. The railway station was built on a grand scale because Queen Victoria regularly travelled from London on the Royal Train, passing through Gosport Station. Her carriage continued along a private stretch of the track into St. Georges Barracks. From here, she would hop into a waiting carriage and make her way to the jetty at the end of Weevil Lane to board a boat to the Isle of Wight.

In more modern times, Gosport was a key training and preparation ground for the D-Day Landings. Most of the troops used Stokes Bay to practice landing on the beaches. The large floating pontoons were also constructed on the beach.

Thankfully, times are not so turbulent, and Gosport continues to be a haven for those seeking a vibrant place to live, where the sea, land and colourful history combine to make it a great place to settle.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop-in or email our team at the Gosport office.

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Gosport is a seaside town with miles of coastline, rich naval history and commanding views of historic Portsmouth harbour, the home of the Royal Navy

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About Fareham

Fareham is an affluent market town lying between Southampton to the west and Portsmouth to the east. The housing stock is a mix of affordable homes to millionaires mansions, and everything in between.

One of the reasons why Fareham is such a popular place to settle is the transport links. It has a railway station, road links to Park Gate and beyond, and several junctions that link to the M27. If you work in Portsmouth or Southampton, Fareham is the ideal commuter town.

You have Cams Hall Golf Club, Fareham Shopping Centre, several wide-open spaces and outlying villages like Funtley, Carisbrooke and Portchester. Fareham has a small yachting community, serviced by Fareham Quay, with its collection of mismatched properties and old rope mills.

If you are looking for a town with an historic high street with many listed and important buildings, great shopping facilities, outstanding transport links and modernity interwoven with historical references, Fareham is the town for you.

History of Fareham

Most of Fareham owes its existence to the Romans, who first settled in the area of the old high street and Wallington. The town of Fernham was mentioned in the Domesday Book as a settlement of 90 dwellings. It was at Fareham creek that some of William the Conqueror's army disembarked and marched on the old capital of Winchester.

The creek was an important commercial port for hundreds of years, with the Bishop of Winchester Mills sited there. Even today, the creek serves commercial purposes, albeit in a reduced capacity.

Prominent iron pioneer Henry Cort had an ironworks in Fareham, located in the neighbouring village of Funtley. The Earl of Southampton owned much of the land to the west of Fareham, stretching towards Titchfield, and it is believed that the Earl was a patron of William Shakespeare, who visited the Earl and staged plays at Titchfield Abbey.

Fareham is most famous for its brickworks, which was a major employer in the area. Its bricks were used to build the Royal Albert Hall. Unfortunately, the industry declined in the 20th century.

Most of Fareham was developed during the 60s, 70s and 80s, turning it into the residential market town we see today.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop in or email our team at the Fareham office.

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“Fareham is an affluent market town lying between Southampton to the west and Portsmouth to the east. The housing stock is a mix of affordable homes to millionaires mansions and everything in between.”

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About Eastleigh

Eastleigh is a modern town, owing much of its redevelopment to the 1950s, 60s, 70, and 80s. However, on the surface, Eastleigh may not appear to be a cosmopolitan place but take a closer look. Southampton International Airport is just a short drive away, giving you genuinely global commuting possibilities.

The airport is ranked the 20th largest in the country, and while it bears the Southampton name, it is actually situated in Eastleigh.

Eastleigh also has a railway station that serves the South Western Main Line from London, Waterloo. It also has excellent bus services, and the M27 motorway is easily accessible for those who commute by car.

If shopping is your thing, the Swan Shopping Centre should have enough high street brands to keep you occupied, and if you fancy popping into Southampton for some retail therapy, it’s only a short car journey away.

History of Eastleigh

At first glance, Eastleigh does not look like the sort of place that can trace its origins back to Roman Britain, but the town has existed for longer than you might think. The name Eastleigh derives from an Anglo-Saxon name, East Leah, which means “clearing in a forest.”

The town was settled by the Romans because of the old Roman road built in A.D 79 between Winchester (Venta Belgarum) and Bitterne (Clausentum), although the earliest actual records date back to 932 AD.

The most recent history relates to the coming of the railways, with Eastleigh falling on the Southampton to Winchester line. In 1891, the London and South Western Railway Company transferred their carriage and wagon works from London to Eastleigh, making it a significant railway town.

In 2006, a Channel 4 programme ranked Eastleigh as the 9th best place to live in Britain. So, if you want to know why the town is so popular, come and see for yourself.

For all the latest market trends, up-to-date information and just downright friendly advice, call, drop in or email our team at the Eastleigh office..

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“At first glance, Eastleigh does not look like the sort of place that can trace its origins back to Roman Britain, but the town has existed for longer than you might think.”

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